Leaders have to make space for creativity, and work for every personality

It is critical for my team to develop unique and inspiring marketing. Unfortunately, in the back-to-back meetings world of a fast-growth company, it is often very difficult to find space for the type of thinking that generates the left-field ideas that will really inspire. So it’s on me to create that space and find ways to tap the creativity of all the different personalities in the room.

For the full team, I try to pull together a big brainstorming meeting at least twice a year. This meeting is a time when people bring out the crazy weird ideas, pull out the sticky notes anything that gets people off their laptops and moving around the room.

We bring 50 plus people together, make sure there is coffee and food, and all laptops are shut off. I kick off the meeting with a presentation intended to get people thinking outside of their normal day-to-day, dreaming of ideas that they thought were too big to accomplish. I encourage people to ask questions, speak up and engage with the topic.

Following the presentation, there are usually two methods I use to get ideas flowing. One is to break out into smaller groups with a …

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4 Reasons CMOs Should Rely on Brand Lift Campaigns

A study by Deloitte and the CMOCouncil called TheCMOShift to Gaining Business Liftfound that the role of a chief marketing officer, or CMO, has changed drastically in 10 years from “brand ambassador” to “revenue generator.”

While this has resulted in a bigger seat at the boardroom table,it has decreased job security. A study published in theWall Street Journalof CMOs from 100 of the top U.S. ad spenders foundCMOtenure of 3.5 years to be the lowest in the C-suite and half as long as CEOs, who average 7.2 years.

A major reasonCMOs’ turnover is high compared to their C-suite peers is because monetizing the digital frontier has fallen on their shoulders. Among the 200CMOs surveyed in the Deloitte andCMOCouncil study, the top method cited (44 percent) for marketers to drive revenue is to “utilize data for effective campaign spend.”

While digital ad spends ($72.5 billion) exceeded TV spends in 2016 for the first time, a new study from WPP projects advertising fraud will double to$16.4 billion in 2017. The bottom line is that it has not gotten any easier to validate ROI with bots and fraud running rampant.

As clicks and impressions lose credibility, “brand lift”

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Leaders have to make space for creativity, and work for every personality

It is critical for my team to develop unique and inspiring marketing. Unfortunately, in the back-to-back meetings world of a fast-growth company, it is often very difficult to find space for the type of thinking that generates the left-field ideas that will really inspire. So it’s on me to create that space and find ways to tap the creativity of all the different personalities in the room.

For the full team, I try to pull together a big brainstorming meeting at least twice a year. This meeting is a time when people bring out the crazy weird ideas, pull out the sticky notes anything that gets people off their laptops and moving around the room.

We bring 50 plus people together, make sure there is coffee and food, and all laptops are shut off. I kick off the meeting with a presentation intended to get people thinking outside of their normal day-to-day, dreaming of ideas that they thought were too big to accomplish. I encourage people to ask questions, speak up and engage with the topic.

Following the presentation, there are usually two methods I use to get ideas flowing. One is to break out into smaller groups with a …

Read more

Leaders have to make space for creativity, and work for every personality

It is critical for my team to develop unique and inspiring marketing. Unfortunately, in the back-to-back meetings world of a fast-growth company, it is often very difficult to find space for the type of thinking that generates the left-field ideas that will really inspire. So it’s on me to create that space and find ways to tap the creativity of all the different personalities in the room.

For the full team, I try to pull together a big brainstorming meeting at least twice a year. This meeting is a time when people bring out the crazy weird ideas, pull out the sticky notes anything that gets people off their laptops and moving around the room.

We bring 50 plus people together, make sure there is coffee and food, and all laptops are shut off. I kick off the meeting with a presentation intended to get people thinking outside of their normal day-to-day, dreaming of ideas that they thought were too big to accomplish. I encourage people to ask questions, speak up and engage with the topic.

Following the presentation, there are usually two methods I use to get ideas flowing. One is to break out into smaller groups with a …

Read more

Why More Data Isn’t Always a Good Thing

As marketers, we’re constantly drowning in data meant to deepen our understanding of customers’ behaviors and needs, which, let’s be honest, many marketers have a tendency to inflate. Don’t get me wrong; metrics can be very useful, but that’s because they play into a feedback loop, not because they’re a “smoking gun.” No metric on its own can explain correlations between marketing tactics and customer behaviors.

In addition, metrics can’t tell you all of the dimensions you need to be paying attention to; for example, whether your engagement messaging is actually hitting the right target.

It all comes down to the difference between just seeing data and understanding what that data means in a larger business-impact context.

Good data and bad marketing

Consider this example from a previous company I worked at that placed a lot of emphasis on metrics. The email marketing team was very proud to have achieved a 15 percent lift in conversions in their latest campaign. Upon closer examination, we found the actual benefit to the business went down. Not only were opt-outs increasing shrinking our marketable universe but revenue per user was down compared to the previous campaign. The marketer in charge of the campaign …

Read more

Leaders have to make space for creativity, and work for every personality

It is critical for my team to develop unique and inspiring marketing. Unfortunately, in the back-to-back meetings world of a fast-growth company, it is often very difficult to find space for the type of thinking that generates the left-field ideas that will really inspire. So it’s on me to create that space and find ways to tap the creativity of all the different personalities in the room.

For the full team, I try to pull together a big brainstorming meeting at least twice a year. This meeting is a time when people bring out the crazy weird ideas, pull out the sticky notes anything that gets people off their laptops and moving around the room.

We bring 50 plus people together, make sure there is coffee and food, and all laptops are shut off. I kick off the meeting with a presentation intended to get people thinking outside of their normal day-to-day, dreaming of ideas that they thought were too big to accomplish. I encourage people to ask questions, speak up and engage with the topic.

Following the presentation, there are usually two methods I use to get ideas flowing. One is to break out into smaller groups with a …

Read more

Why More Data Isn’t Always a Good Thing

As marketers, we’re constantly drowning in data meant to deepen our understanding of customers’ behaviors and needs, which, let’s be honest, many marketers have a tendency to inflate. Don’t get me wrong; metrics can be very useful, but that’s because they play into a feedback loop, not because they’re a “smoking gun.” No metric on its own can explain correlations between marketing tactics and customer behaviors.

In addition, metrics can’t tell you all of the dimensions you need to be paying attention to; for example, whether your engagement messaging is actually hitting the right target.

It all comes down to the difference between just seeing data and understanding what that data means in a larger business-impact context.

Good data and bad marketing

Consider this example from a previous company I worked at that placed a lot of emphasis on metrics. The email marketing team was very proud to have achieved a 15 percent lift in conversions in their latest campaign. Upon closer examination, we found the actual benefit to the business went down. Not only were opt-outs increasing shrinking our marketable universe but revenue per user was down compared to the previous campaign. The marketer in charge of the campaign …

Read more

The 4 elements every event landing page needs

From product launch parties to community meetups, from holiday celebrations to webinars – events are an excellent way to build relationships with your customers. But before you can build those relationships, you must first reach your customers. Event marketing online is the key to engaging your audience and generating awareness. While most business owners lean heavily on email marketing and social media to spread the word, your digital promotion and marketing efforts can be amplified with landing pages.

A landing page is a targeted web page that is designed to prompt visitors to take a specific action. We’ve written a lot about how they can be used to collect leads, build your email list and generate revenue, but they’re especially useful when it’s time to encourage customers to participate in an event. To help you create a page that has the greatest impact, we’ve put together a quick guide. Before you publish your landing page, make sure to follow these four tips.

Don’t underestimate the power of design

It’s no secret that consumers prefer to engage with beautifully designed content. So spend some time thinking about the look and feel of your landing page.

All images should …

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6 tips for making a logo part of your email campaigns

Does your business need a logo? Whether you’re refreshing an existing logo or creating a new one from scratch, keep in mind that logos are essential for brand awareness. After all, a logo is the distillation of everything your business does and stands for in one emblem that consumers comprehend in mere seconds.

If you’re mulling a new logo design, consider how it will tie into your email marketing efforts. Here are six things to keep in mind:

1. Big or small, look good above all

Your readers read emails on different devices, browsers and screens. A strong logo for your business should look spectacular whether it’s displayed large on a desktop screen, or tiny on a smartphone. As you’ll see below, this tip is the most important of all, and influences nearly every part of your logo design.

2. Colors matter – especially in email

What color should your logo be? Psychologists have long understood that colors carry unspoken meanings. Here’s a quick rundown of some of the most common:

  • Red: bold, passionate, sexy, powerful
  • Orange: creativity, cheer, fun, youth
  • Yellow:sunny, optimism
  • Green: growth, rejuvenation, environmental, health
  • Blue: professional, calming, trustworthy, knowledgeable
  • Purple: wise, blissful, spiritual
  • Black:
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Leaders have to make space for creativity, and work for every personality

It is critical for my team to develop unique and inspiring marketing. Unfortunately, in the back-to-back meetings world of a fast-growth company, it is often very difficult to find space for the type of thinking that generates the left-field ideas that will really inspire. So it’s on me to create that space and find ways to tap the creativity of all the different personalities in the room.

For the full team, I try to pull together a big brainstorming meeting at least twice a year. This meeting is a time when people bring out the crazy weird ideas, pull out the sticky notes anything that gets people off their laptops and moving around the room.

We bring 50 plus people together, make sure there is coffee and food, and all laptops are shut off. I kick off the meeting with a presentation intended to get people thinking outside of their normal day-to-day, dreaming of ideas that they thought were too big to accomplish. I encourage people to ask questions, speak up and engage with the topic.

Following the presentation, there are usually two methods I use to get ideas flowing. One is to break out into smaller groups with a …

Read more